THREE NEW MOTORCYCLES WE HOPE HUSQVARNA, SUZUKI, AND YAMAHA WILL BUILD

Yamaha R25 Concept

    Will the Ninja 300 and CBR300R steal all the entry-level-sportbike thunder in the US forever? We hope not because the R25 Concept is a killer riff on YZR-M1 styling that dresses up an all-new 249cc parallel twin. Says the press material: “It boasts a powerful and sporty ride in the high rpm range while being easy to handle. The R25 is positioned and offered as an entry-model in the sportbike category for developed markets like Japan and Europe and as a top performance sportbike for emerging markets, primarily throughout Asia.” You’ll notice it didn’t say “America.” Yamaha US said “no comment,” but we’re fairly certain a street version is on the way to our shores.

Suzuki Recursion

   We saw it happen in cars and then in bikes. More power needs a bigger engine, which needs bigger brakes, a stronger chassis, and a bigger gas tank. Finally, you can hardly steer the monster; it’s a power station on wheels. Can we please have the handling of a middleweight but with real power? Revealed at the Tokyo Motor Show, this turbocharged 588cc parallel twin is called “Recursion,” which means “flowing back, repeating.” Recursion makes 100 hp at 8,000 rpm, but peak torque is a whopping 74 pound-feet way down at 4,500 rpm. Instead of the never-ending upshifting of a 600, Recursion delivers the grunt of a literbike, given across a three-times-wider band and packaged into a light middleweight. —Kevin Cameron


Husqvarna 701



   Although there were 13 Husqvarnas on display at EICMA—seven enduros and six motocross bikes—the lion’s share of attention was paid to the intriguing 701, a concept said to acknowledge the historically Swedish marque’s 110-year history while also pointing to its future. Powered by a 690cc single with a claimed 75 hp, the 701 looks like a supermoto of the future, boasting a chrome-moly frame and clean, uncluttered looks that reflect Scandinavian design. Neat details include a long, ribbed seat that reaches forward all the way to the radiator shrouds, plus an exhaust that is almost completely covered in back, where the fuel tank also resides. Will owner KTM build a Husky like this? Probably not. —Andrew Bornhop

Source: Cycleworld

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